Photo
shitshilarious:

iliveinmattsmithspants:

territorialcreep:

itseasytoremember:

whythefuckareyouromeo:


0ver-doze:

omg they are so offended if you lick them back. 

Fun fact! Dogs lick the mouths of those they consider higher in rank! So if you lick them back, they are not offended, they just don’t see themselves as higher than you and they are confused! The second dog must be a very loyal dog because he or she literally refuses to be licked back haha! I love dogs.

i started reading that expecting an angry rant and it turned out to be one of the nicest things ever.

I have reblogged this like ten times

My cat grooms me. What does that mean?

It means your cat thinks your style is wack and is trying to help

shitshilarious:

iliveinmattsmithspants:

territorialcreep:

itseasytoremember:

whythefuckareyouromeo:


0ver-doze
:

image

omg they are so offended if you lick them back. 

Fun fact! Dogs lick the mouths of those they consider higher in rank! So if you lick them back, they are not offended, they just don’t see themselves as higher than you and they are confused! The second dog must be a very loyal dog because he or she literally refuses to be licked back haha! I love dogs.

i started reading that expecting an angry rant and it turned out to be one of the nicest things ever.

I have reblogged this like ten times

My cat grooms me. What does that mean?

It means your cat thinks your style is wack and is trying to help

(Source: kingjrific, via onelastperfectverse)

Tags: Dogs
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denickespares said: Hi, I'm a game dev student and I'm going to create a 3D Puzzle Platformer for my thesis. Can you give me some tips on Level Design? I've played lots of those kinds before, but now I feel like I know nothing about them. Thank you in advance.

askagamedev:

Let me preface this by saying that level design is a really deep subject, and that there are plenty of people who spend their entire careers working on the concept of level design. There is no way I’m going to be able to cover everything you’re going to need to know, so I’ll just try to hit some valuable core techniques and principles in my experience and hope that it helps. If you aren’t sure about something or have more questions, feel free to ask further.

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#1. Provide opportunities to use the mechanics

Games are about teaching the player how the mechanics work, and then letting the player use the mechanics to have fun. You want to give the player an opportunity to use the new mechanics you give them in a way that makes sense. You always want to start by giving them the most obvious way to use a new item, skill, power, or whatever. Make it as simple as possible, and do it at least three times to help hammer home how it works. You want to make it feel familiar to them so that they will be able to recognize when they can use it, and when they cannot. Repetition makes things familiar, but too much repetition makes them boring.

When plotting out the critical path to your level, you want to mark where they have to use a game mechanic to progress. If they aren’t using the mechanics enough, you’ll want to add more opportunities to use them. 

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#2. Give players things to do. Keep it varied.

Avoid making players use the same mechanic multiple times in a row unless you’ve just introduced it. Try to keep a good mix of things to do by revisiting old mechanics as well as using new ones to keep things fresh. Start by constructing a critical path, and then mark points along the path where the level design might branch out and offer additional ways to get through. Not every level needs these options, but you should have them available to give players some choice and a sense of agency. Choosing which mechanic to use to overcome an obstacle is an excellent way to do this. 

Make sure the players don’t go for too long without doing something, but don’t make them have to do things constantly either. That can cause player fatigue. Vary it between segments with a high number of things to do, a low number of things to do, and just rest times where the only thing to do is walk around at their leisure, preferably with something interesting to just look at.

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#3. Always draw players forward through the level

Incentivize the players to progress by showing them new things, preferably in the direction you want them to go. Bright lights, shiny objects, interesting colors, notable contrast in environment to where they are, treasure just out of reach, and even obstacles are your tools for this. When they enter a new area, they should never feel confused as to where to go. There should always be at least one clear option for where to go next. If there is more than one path, they should be easily visually differentiated. 

Remember, bright colors and lights will attract people. Dark colors and dim lighting will repel people. Moving objects will attract attention over static ones. Flashing lights are very hard to miss. Audio cues are another excellent avenue to notify a player that something is going on. Use these to your advantage to draw people through your level.

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#4. Not every reward needs to be obtained immediately

Dangle rewards for the player in front of her in highly visible ways, but don’t always let her immediately obtain them. Sometimes they should be rewarded for making it this far, but other times you want to tell them “you should remember this place and come back later”. It’s an excellent way to showcase different use cases for a particular game mechanic that you’re in the process of introducing. Remember that a reward should only be given if she has done something to earn it - used the mechanic, solved the puzzle, traversed the level, etc. Getting a reward after completing a challenge is one of the things that makes players happiest.

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#5. Create opportunities to showcase mechanical synergy

After teaching the player how to use a mechanic at a basic level, build on it by making her use that mechanic in conjunction with other mechanics. It encourages her to explore how the different game mechanics interact with each other, which adds depth to the gameplay. You can utilize options like timing, location, scale, or other such things to add new variations that the player may not have explored.

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#6. The player should be able to see a clear goal at (almost) all times

Even if a player is in the middle of something, there should be a clearly visible place that he wants to go next and a way to go in that direction. Getting lost is super frustrating. Not knowing where to go is super frustrating. You (usually) want to keep frustration to a minimum. Give the player something to head towards so that, once she is done exploring the current area, she knows where to go next.

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#7. Theme is important

When you create a level, you should have a theme. It could be an ice palace, a dark dungeon, a seedy waterfront bar, a high tech office building, a military base, or any of a number of other things. Your visuals should match the theme, because the theme will help fill in the little gaps and details you may have forgotten or overlooked. A robot factory can have enemies that move mechanically, but an amazonian jungle would not. An ancient ruin might have climbable ropes and statues, but they’d probably seem out of place in a shopping mall. Try to pick a theme that works with your mechanics. It is easiest to get immersed into a game when both gameplay and theme work together coherently.

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#8. Playtest, iterate, playtest some more

Get people to playtest your levels. Give them the absolute minimum of what they should know to play the game, and then step back and take notes. Bite your tongue and do not offer help or suggestions. If they get stuck and ask for help, give them the minimum necessary to pass where they are stuck. Observe and note what is working and what is not.

Where are the players getting stuck? What are the frustration points? What are they enjoying? Write it all down, let it rest for a little bit (a few hours to a day, to get a little distance), and then start analyzing and thinking about possible solutions. Try your new changes out and repeat the process. If possible, get testers who have never tried your game before. Pay close attention to what they try, and note what things seem intuitive to them. Is there any way you can take advantage of that intuition? Do you need to do something to discourage it earlier?

These are the main concepts I try to look to when I am creating a level. They have each served me very well over the years, and I hope that you can see why they are important guidelines. Good level design isn’t easy to do, which is why you see people making their entire careers out of it. I hope that this helps. Best of luck with your thesis!

Tags: Level design
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neraciro said: Hi Doug. I'm writing a short story at the moment, but it's not going well. I've scrapped what I thought was bad twice now and I'm onto my third effort to write up a proper draft. What advice do you have to offer a person like me? I'm currently torn between the age-old idioms of perseverance is best and knowing when to give up. It just feels like currently I'm beating my head on a stone wall and nothing good's coming out of it.

dougbeyermtg:

It sounds like you’re brute-forcing your way through writing and revising in one step. I sympathize. In my experience, that will drive you crazygonuts. Try separating your process into two phases.

In the first phase, take your Inner Editor and stick ‘em in an Oblivion Ring. All thoughts that have to do with evaluating what you’re writing get shelved for now. Your goal in this phase is not to write something amazing—“amazing” is evaluative. “Good enough to satisfy my aesthetic standards” is evaluative. “Non-crapola” is evaluative. All those Inner Editor thoughts get turned off, as best you can. Your goal during this phase is this: FINISH. WRITE WRITE WRITE until you FINISH and type the words THE END. A this point it matters ZERO PERCENT what goes on in your story; you are just hurling clay at the potter’s wheel so that you can craft this sculpture later. This phase is not about quality — it is about finishing. It is Supposed. To. Suck.

THEN put your writing aside for a while. Simmer. Take a walk. Take two walks. Eat something delicious. Pet a fuzzy animal. Refuel.

THEN enter the second phase. Now you’re a different person, in a way. You Naturalize that O-Ring and bring your Inner Editor back in full force. You aren’t criticizing the author of this clay in front of you— you’re using the raw materials they’ve provided you to shape it into something. The something might be almost there, and it might just take a bit of smoothing and spinning to get it to be great. (My rough drafts are not like this, and if yours are, I kind of hate you a little.) Or it might take squashing the whole thing back into a lump of clay to begin to form it into something beautiful again. But I find that every draft d’ crapola has at least one shining hint of a great idea buried in it. Look for that. Look for those moments that move you, even though you wrote it. Look for things that make you giggle all alone at your laptop. Look for stuff that makes you want to say, “Wait. Go back. Zoom and enhance on that last part”—that’s your cruddy draft, and your Inner Editor, telling you when something is working.

When you do both of those phases at the same time, what happens is that the Inner Editor becomes paralyzing. Its voice becomes so loud that it reaches beyond words on the page, all the way to words you haven’t even typed yet. You toss out everything you have before you’ve even whipped up a batch of raw materials. You stop working before you’ve managed to create that tiny gorgeous detail that you were trying to reach. Resist the urge to bring in the critical thoughts too early. Give yourself permission to go to weird and awful places, because just beyond those places are the best ideas and the best lines of dialogue and the best heartstring-plucking imagery you’ll ever have. Keep going. Your breakthrough might be ten thousand words from now, so you have two options: write ten thousand words agonizingly slowly over the next year, criticizing yourself about every line and hating every minute of it, or blast out ten thousand words THIS WEEK, and be basking in the glow of that tiny mote of awesome by Sunday.

I believe this is true of any craft, for most people. Separation of Creation and Evaluation is so important. Both are required, they just don’t play well together.

Photo
discoverynews:

trce:

the-actual-universe:

benigoat:

Time-lapse of river changing course over 28 years.

This messed me up a little bit.

rebloggngigingi

Awesome meanders!

Nature is awesome.

discoverynews:

trce:

the-actual-universe:

benigoat:

Time-lapse of river changing course over 28 years.

This messed me up a little bit.

rebloggngigingi

Awesome meanders!

Nature is awesome.

(Source: reddit.com)

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queendread:

I don’t understand the USA, all your roads are straight and all your cities look like they were planned using Excel.

Everyone knows the only way to build a city is to wait until a bunch of tiny villages merge together over centuries and create a sprawling clusterfuck of winding roads that make no sense and have no street signs and are impossible to navigate unless you’ve lived there all your life.

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About time they made a UK equivalent of the American eagle meme!

(via onelastperfectverse)

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On Becoming a Voice Actor

dgaider:

Hello Mr Gaider, I was wondering if you had any information on being a voice actor in general and being one specifically for bioware. Thanks! — fan question

I know only a little about this, being exposed to one part of it, so rather than give an answer based on my assumptions, I sat down next to Caroline Livingstone (our VO director and producer) and got her input regarding it. That wasn’t too hard, as we were in an airport waiting for our delayed flight.

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On Voice Over

dgaider:

One thing I’ve discovered over time is that people don’t really understand the process of voice over recording—how it’s written, how it gets into the game, anything like that. They understand, on some level, that at some point actors have to show up and speak their lines…but beyond that? It’s pretty vague. So here’s some elaboration on how that works.

Read More

This is gold. Thank you, Mr Gaider - there’s just not enough of this kind of material around.

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brandonmod131:

betterbemeta:

slackeremeritus:

ghostalebrije:

theblondebitch:

London Comic Con October 2013 

Hot fucking DAMN Assassins from all over the world and a shitton of different time periods?!

Rifle Assassin in the third gif could get it so hard.

NOW I WANNA DO A MEXICAN REVOLUTION ASSASSIN OMFG

COWBOY ASSASSIN THO

SOLDIER ASSASSIN THO

OK, can I say I love this not just because of the variation of time periods and the awesome shooting but because all of the assassin cosplayers are visually different

not only is there a good amount of women in there, but also everybody has a lot of bodily variation and different silhouettes, they’re cosplayers, REAL PEOPLE dressing up rather than video game people or specifically-cast models or actors picked to look a certain way, so we get so much more of an organic variety. 

And it doesn’t matter if ANYONE thinks they don’t look ‘right’, when you’re shot this way, when you work it, when you’re confident, you can be of any body type and you will always look awesome.

goal: join these people one day with my own cosplay

(Source: miyku, via onelastperfectverse)

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ogi-rinal:

Amazing talent!

(Source: imbrains)

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